Feeding the Dolphins at Tin Can Bay

Fraser Island is a haven of wildlife opportunities and encounters just waiting for you to enjoy against a backdrop of pristine beaches, shallow waters, and lush rainforests. As well as numerous outdoor activities and fun adventures to be had, there’s one special thing you can do on the island that draws in thousands of animal-lovers every year.

At Tin Can Bay, you can feed the resident Australian Humpback Dolphins. The pod is home to nine animals at the moment that are led by Mystique, the alpha male. Others in the group include Patch, Ella, Squirt, Harmony, Aussie, Valentine, Chompy, and White Fin.

What Are Humpback Dolphins?

These unique creatures are river and estuarine dolphins that need around 20 metres of water in order to fish. When they’re not out hunting or feeding at Tin Can Bay, they like to bask in the sunshine in shallow tidal creek areas. For the most part, the dolphins’ diet is made up of squid, fish, and crustaceans.

The History of the Dolphins at Tin Can Bay.

The dolphins at Tin Can Bay have been visiting for around 30 years ever since a dolphin nicknamed Scarry appeared in the bay with a young male dolphin, now called Mystique. He was thought to be her youngest surviving offspring. Though Scarry hasn’t been spotted in the area since 2003, Mystique and his pod still come into the boat ramp every day to watch the humans that gather there to feed them.

Feeding time starts early, giving visitors the perfect way to start their day on Fraser Island. The humpback dolphins swim right on up to visitors who stand knee-deep in the shallow water.

As the creatures arrive, you can hand them their treats and watch as they frolic in the shallow waters in the early morning sunshine..

The dolphin feeding is a popular and important part of life on Fraser Island, and it is regulated by the Queensland Government to ensure that the daily occurrence is safe and enjoyable for both the human and dolphin participants.

To make sure everything goes to plan, visitors are only allowed to feed the dolphins with food purchased on-site, and the total amount of food given out each day is rationed so the dolphins still have to go out and hunt for themselves like the wild animals they are.